• Nine writers from four countries awarded $150,000 Windham-Campbell Prizes

    The Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library has announced the winners of the 2015 Donald Windham-Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prizes at Yale. The writers, who hail from the United States, United Kingdom, Nigeria, and South Africa, were chosen confidentially in three categories — fiction, non-fiction, and drama. Honored for their literary achievements as well as their potential, the winners will […]

    Nine writers from four countries awarded $150,000 Windham-Campbell Prizes
  • Oman: The Call of Desert Sand

    Italian-American Journalist Donatella Lorch, a former New York Times correspondent based in Peshawar, Nairobi and New York, writes a regular column, Tangled Journeys, from her current home in Katmandu. She recounts here her family’s recent journey to Oman.    Bakhit wasn’t the Bedouin I expected. At 54, his beard grizzled-white, he needed to recline his car seat to accommodate his […]

    Copyright Donatella Lorch
  • Williams and O’Reilly: Not the only truth-fudging in the name of journalism

    The recent incidents of two leading American TV personalities claiming to have covered specific events, when they had not, only come across as yet more nails in the journalistic coffins of those still seeking to do real reporting. As writer Edward Girardet maintains, the truth-fudging of disgraced NBC anchor Brian Williams that he had been travelling in a US military helicopter […]

    Many journalists, including cameraman, had to walk clandestinely hundreds of miles to obtain their coverage during the Soviet war.
  • HSBC Sheltered Murky Cash Linked to Dictators and Arms Dealers

    A team of journalists from 45 countries unearths secret bank accounts maintained for criminals, traffickers, tax dodgers, politicians and celebrities. In the wake of Wikileaks, Edward Snowdon and other revelations in the public interest, including government and private efforts to halt such forms of whistle-blowing, now come the actions of the Swiss branch of HSBC, a global banking giant. HSCB, formerly […]

    HSBC Sheltered Murky Cash Linked to Dictators and Arms Dealers
  • To Kill a Sparrow: Afghan women jailed for love

    For years, filmmaker Zohreh Soleimani followed a tragic romance set in Afghanistan. The couple met, fell in love … and went to jail. So what went wrong? With her camera in hand, Zohreh confronted the family that put one woman in jail for the crime of falling in love with the wrong man. She opens up to Reveal – the website of […]

    To Kill a Sparrow: Afghan women jailed for love
  • Will the World Humanitarian Summit pass the accountability test?

    Nick van Praag, who directs the Ground Truth Programme of   Keystoneaccountability, explores whether World Humanitarian Summit will really look hard at whether, and if not why, humanitarian response is really working. As the long run-up to next year’s World Humanitarian Summit gathers pace, a legitimate question is whether it will ratchet up pressure on the humanitarian system to do […]

    Will the World Humanitarian Summit pass the accountability test?
  • They don’t make them like this anymore. Veteran CBS journalist Bob Simon in Action

    Journalist, writer and Central Asian specialist Thomas Goltz sends us this memory at the Azerbaijani Oil Baths of Bob Simon, who died tragically in a car crash in New York City on 12 February, 2015.   Naftalan, Azerbaijan: The stocky nurse with a double-set of gold teeth leaned over the double-sized bathtub and grabbed Bob’s wrist to take a pulse, dipping […]

    Bob Simon being released at the end of the First Gulf War. Copyright CBS
  • Don’t Expect a ‘Grexit': Greece Can’t Escape Europe

    The following article by Wayne Merry, a former US diplomat and a now a member of the American Foreign Policu Council, was first published in The National Interest http://nationalinterest.org Global financial markets currently obsess about the fate of a small Balkan country’s sovereign debt and its impact on the Eurozone. However, if the burden of Greek debt were to disappear overnight, […]

    Don’t Expect a ‘Grexit': Greece Can’t Escape Europe

Other News

American Cartoonist Jeff Danziger. See his website for cartoons and books.

Jeff Danziger on Europe’s Backyard War

Jeff Danziger is a US-based cartoonist, author and contributor to The Essential Edge. For his cartoons and books, please see:  http://www.danzigercartoons.com/ Putin’s Solution cartoon

Read more ›
Youth letter writing contest: the world they want

Youth letter writing contest: the world they want

As young people gather this week for the Youth Assembly at the United Nations (UN) in Geneva, the Swiss-based Universal Postal Union (UPU) is asking budding writers to describe the world they envisage for the future as part of its 44th International Letter-Writing Competition for Young People. The Essential Edge urges parents to encourage their children to write letters so […]

Read more ›
Oklahoma had 3 times as many earthquakes in 2014 than California

Oklahoma had 3 times as many earthquakes in 2014 than California

Earthquakes are synonymous with California to most Americans, but West Coasters might be surprised to learn they’re far from the new center of the seismic landscape in the United States. This report by  Michael Corey was published on the Reveal Now site of the Center for Investigative Reporting in San Francisco. Oklahoma recorded more than three times as many earthquakes as […]

Read more ›
How to Save Afghanistan’s Democracy

How to Save Afghanistan’s Democracy

Afghanistan’s last election almost tore the country apart. The next one has to be different. In an opinion article for Foreign Policy, Tabish Forugh explores the pitfalls – and options – for the country’s next nation-wide parliamentary and polls this coming May. September 21, 2014, after months of gridlock following a hotly contested election, Afghan presidential candidates Ashraf Ghani and […]

Read more ›
King Tom cemetery, the largest graveyard in Freetown, Sierra Leone, has expanded three times since May. Image by Amy Maxmen. Sierra Leone, 2014.

How Sierra Leone’s Fight Against Ebola Tested Cultural Traditions.

The following piece is written by Amy Maxmen, a science and medical journalist who travelled to Sierra Leone with a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. FREETOWN, Sierra Leone—A great quarrel followed the death of a pregnant Guinean woman in June. Mourners refused to allow a team of outsiders dressed in what looked like white space suits to […]

Read more ›
Better Mapping for Better Journalism

Better Mapping for Better Journalism

Willie Shubert of the Washington DC-based New Security Beat explores new visual tools for improving environmental journalism. Nearly every local story has a global context. This is especially true when it comes to the environment, and there may be no better way to show that context than through visualization. But in developing countries, where so many important changes are happening, journalists often […]

Read more ›
This little piggy went to China: How China purchased a prime cut of America’s pork industry.

This little piggy went to China: How China purchased a prime cut of America’s pork industry.

The Chinese have been moving steadily into Africa cornering natural resources but often in a manner that offers little to ordinary people such as jobs. Americans may be surprised to know that this is not just a phenomenon affecting developing country minerals or food, but also the United States. With nearly 1.4 billion people to feed, China has become the largest […]

Read more ›
Smoke and flames rise over a hill near the Syrian town of Kobani after an airstrike, as seen from the Mursitpinar crossing on the Turkish-Syrian border in the southeastern town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province, October 23, 2014. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

One (difficult) step to curbing extremism

The following article written by Sarah Chayes, a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment, was contributed as a blog to the Reuters.com website. (See direct link). Given Sarah’s exceptional experience working in Afghanistan and her first-hand knowledge of militant Islam, we are reproducing it here. Why did nearly half of Iraq open itself to Islamic State, a militant group seen […]

Read more ›
Switzerland’s Anne Frank Legacy: Beyond frontiers and religions

Switzerland’s Anne Frank Legacy: Beyond frontiers and religions

The following article was first contributed in November, 2014 to Le News, an English-language newspaper for the Lake Geneva region, by then editor Edward Girardet. The article received an enormous amount of interest, so we are publishing it here. Several weeks ago, I travelled to Basel with my wife and 14-year-old son to see an old family friend, Buddy Elias, […]

Read more ›
Produced by United Methodist Church Communications

Imaginative cartoons: Reaching out for AIDS, Malaria and Ebola

Geneva-based animator Firdaus Kharas, founder of Chocolate Moose Media, is an an expert in behaviour-change communications who has produced global campaigns for reaching out to crisis-affected populations. Here is the story behind his latest motion graphic on ebola, which is now in 17 different languages and being used in Ivory Coast, Guinea, and Liberia. To see and download this exceptional video, […]

Read more ›